Tiny Stories, Tiny Tales

shock at 6:30 AM

Shock and a dim sense of foreboding is when you wake up in the morning, use the toilet and then go to wash your hands…and no water comes out of the faucet. It was 6:30 and so I crawled back into bed, contemplating what to tell Jeff. One part of my head just wanted to doze till 6:45, another part was Freaked Out. Somehow Jeff was partly awake and turned to look at me.
“What is it?” he mumbled.
“The faucet isn't working,” was my sleepy numbed reply.

No and the faucet isn't going to work anytime soon. We stumbled down two flight of steps and landed in a watery basement. Oh, it wasn't so bad. The sub-pump was doing its part and chugging it all out. But there was a hole in the wall, about the size of two quarters and water was just gushing out. It was quite fascinating and the more I watched it, the more fascinating it got. There was a very serene sort of sound to it. Quite like those fountains or waterfalls people rig up in their yards. The soothing sound of water, you know. It was very soothing down there- in between times when the sub-pump switched on and off.
We hustled around and got our boxes off of the ground- we don't think anything was hurt, really. One box that we got down to the bottom, hadn't even got wet through the cardboard. Good old moving boxes. So everything is perched on high, or in the section that must be a bit higher than the rest- a sort of peaceable land, where wet and damp does not prevail.

The story is, our water is turned off. The City of Batavia obligingly arrived at about 7 (they don't fuck around) and used their strength and sinew to turn the water valve off. Apparently, when someone laid the concrete sidewalk, they knocked over the box underneath that controls the valve that turns our water on and off. So…the City did not look pleased (the city took the form of two brawny men. The young one looked pissed as hell and the older had great manners and a rather sad look). The pipe has two breaks in, they told Jeff later as I had already left for work. One is for the City to repair and involves ripping out the sidewalk and the other is for the owner to repair. It will require a backhoe and cooperation between the City and the plumber.

Hmmmmm…so to make a huge long story shorter, the owner was Finally reached through a very sick relator and got the plumber. The plumber arrived and turned sick as well because he realized the pipe Had busted in the ground and that required calling JULIE. For those who don't know, JULIE is an Illinois mandate. And a real bitch. It's required by our state that we call JULIE whenever we intend to make any sort of hole in the ground. Garden, backhoe, putting in shrubs, trees, whatever. And JULIE calls everyone- the electricity company, the cable guy, the gas guy, the water guy and la-di-da. These people from various companies come out, use their little machines and figure out where electric lines are underground, cable, water mains, etc. This is, of course, for everyone's protection from hitting dangerous things in the ground. However, JULIE is notoriously slow and rather slack. And they give you a date when you can start digging your holes. For us, this time, it's Wednesday. Wednesday without water. And who knows? Given JULIE's ineptness (and the companies we pay bills to), it might take longer than that.
The owner's wife was very sweet and they offered to pay to put us up at a hotel. That's tempting but grim. I hate hotels (they're so bland and so utterly depressing and boring!) and while running water and toilets ROCK, we just thought we'd wing it. Gallons of water, refilling the gallons at neighbors (to make the toilet flush) and running over the Library to use their facilities, will the be the name of the game these next few days. Wish us luck (and sanity).

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Life Lessons from a Cardinal

Outdoor living is coming in fits and starts now that it’s June. Last week it was in the 90’s (30C) and today it is gentle and cool with thunderstorms passing by north and south, bringing coolness in the wake of their stormy skirts. The sun shines but the thunder rumbles nearby and my cats retreat farther indoors to snooze on chairs instead of near windows.

It is tempting to join them. The heat break means that deep good sleep is possible again. Even with air conditioning, I sleep poorly when it’s hot. I sleep best when it rains.

And it has been raining at night but in great torrid thunderstorms where the house shakes and the windows rattle. Sometimes I lie in bed as the thunderstorms march by and wonder at the fate of all the creatures and people living outside.

It is summer and I have no arguments with it. It’s too hard to argue with the seasons. On the beautiful days, I sip my breakfast tea outdoors and watch the birds and squirrels to start my day. There’s always a drama playing out in the backyard. My favorite is the cardinal who walks along the deck rail, casting his bright black eye here and there and then breaks into song until a robin kicks him out. When the coast is clear, he returns and does the same thing all over again. Despite my nearness, he doesn’t mind me at all and I adore his bright red plumage and courageous laughing heart. His song cheers my soul and I’ve come to recognize his particular song. It falls under the same lines as all cardinals but it has a bit of improvised trill at the end. I think he’s been hanging out with song sparrows and got Ideas.

He’s a hard individual to photograph (all flash and movement) but I’ve shared a photo of a cardinal from National Geographic so you can get the idea. He’s hard to ignore and is a permanent on the robins’ blacklist. I aspire to such a level of happy insouciance.

How to Get Through a Big Book

How to get through a Big Book and have a little fun too.

  1. Make and eat food mentioned in the book (big books always include food, usually in meticulous detail).
  2. Read a little bit each day.
  3. Make a soundtrack.
  4. Dress like a character from the book for a day. Or a week. Or a month if it really grabs you.
  5. Ten minutes to kill? Daydream about the landscape or what the characters are seeing as they move through their day.
  6. Read passages you enjoy out loud. If you’re in the right mood, record yourself reading passages and share it (Instagram is great for this). Include illustrations if you like (thank you, Shirin).
  7. Whip out a highlighter or some sticky tabs for those great parts.
  8. Pace yourself and remember, reading gigantic books isn’t a race. It’s about the journey. Might as well bring along snacks, good drinks, great lighting, and enjoy the ride.